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A Top Mathematical Model for continuous improvement of All Self-Defense methods

Updated: Jun 16, 2022

In this article, we discuss the possibility of continuous improvement of different self-defense methods through combinations of effective exercises from other methods. According to our assumption, this process is supposed to reduce the risk of survival in the exercise and increase the trainee’s benefit from the exercise. When an ultimate goal is through the investment of minimal time in the trainee's learning to bring him to higher survival achievements than if we were to work on one exercise or another using only a certain method of self-defense. In this article, we will try to answer questions such as: What are built-in and controllable risks of self-defense exercises? What made me take the Markovich Model to describe the risk of survival in one assault incident or another? What is the level of benefit for the trainee in a particular exercise? How is the Markovich Model applied to measuring the improvement of a self-defense method?

 

What are built-in and controllable risks of self-defense exercises?

In this article, we refer to the two levels of risk that exist in the technical execution of one exercise or another, built-in risk and risk in control. When they both, together create a general level of risk for survival in an assault event. We assume that the more complex the exercise, the higher the overall risk of survival. The goal is to reduce it! The following are the main definitions and differences between built-in risk and controlled risk:

Built-in risk - is the natural level of risk inherent in the process of performing a particular exercise, which cannot be reduced, no matter who performs it and at what level the exercise will be performed! That is, it is a minimal risk of injury that an average-skilled person expects when performing one exercise or another.

Controllable risk - is the probability that can be controlled through many repetitions of the exercise in appropriate groups; In a realistic and appropriate method of self-defense; Through realistic scenarios and appropriate psychological preparation, etc...

To reduce the risk of built-in survival below its natural level, we suggest using a combination of different self-defense methods such as Krav-Maga and Jiu-Jitsu, Krav-Maga and KALAH, Wrestling, and KALAH. When, we assume that the greater the differences between the methods, the more effective the self-defense method will be created. That is, it will make it possible to reduce the risk of built-in survival, and increase the level of benefit from learning one exercise or another for the trainee. As a result, we propose a mathematical model for the risk assessment of Markovich, which can be applied for the purpose of the risk assessment mentioned above. In our opinion, the model refers to a number of important parameters such as built-in risk; Risk in control; Benefit of a trainee in a particular exercise. When investing time in one particular exercise or another is a bottleneck for a Trainee and Coach.

What made me take the Markovich Model to describe the risk of survival in one assault incident or another?

After many comments from professionals in the field of self-defense in general and applicable martial arts in particular who deal with the threat of a gun, knife, stick, etc ... and who claim with reason: That in every exercise there is a risk, and benefit to the trainee at this risk! When, in each exercise and in each applied method it is required to spend t, t+, or t++ hours, and each self-defense exercise usually consists of components specified below from A to C inclusive. When inclusive sections A to C can be brought to maximum improvement and still remain at a higher level of risk for built-in survival and a lower level of benefit for the trainee. Due to a certain threshold, or saturation of the method, this does not allow further improvement, no matter how many hours we spend. However, in our opinion, this problem can be overcome, and as a result, we have decided to write a reference to this problem by proposing a continuous improvement of self-defense methods through combinations of essentially opposite methods. When we propose section D below, this should provide a solution to this problem. Reduce the risk of survival and increase the benefit of the exercise for the trainee. All this by investing T = t+ hours, i.e. during additional and optimal study time of the trainee, which is designed to reduce the risk of survival and increase the benefit of a particular exercise. Sections A to D are presented below when section D intended to reduce the built-in risk of survival and increase the benefit of a particular exercise for the trainee.

  • Section A: Appropriate psychological preparation for the environment.

  • Section B: Appropriate physical preparation for the environment.

  • Section C: Mentally preparation for the Environment.

  • Section D: Reducing the risk of survival, by a combination of alternative exercises, and as a result, the creation of an improved style.

Let me explain what is meant by reducing the risk of survival and the increasing benefit of a particular exercise. Exercise A can be more dangerous than Exercise B, but in Exercise A the benefit of the exercise for the trainee is higher than in Exercise B. What does the benefit of the exercise mean for the trainee? An explanation of the benefit of the exercise for the trainee is a cornerstone in separating different methods of self-defense. For that matter, the Krav-Maga, the KALAH, the Kali, the Dennis Survival, the Russian combat SAMBO, and more ... other applied methods in self-defense. Each of the methods gives a subjective solution to various problems that arise in tactical self-defense against knife, pistol, stick, and more ... When, it is clear to us that in each essentially homogeneous exercise (say stabbing a knife from above frequently) different solutions based on the method philosophy. In any homogeneous exercise, there is a risk that cannot be reduced and the level of benefit for the trainee in the exercise is different in each and every method.


What is the level of benefit for the trainee in a particular exercise?

To explain the level of benefit for the trainee in a particular exercise, let’s take an example from Krav-Maga. We will analyze a self-defense exercise against a knife attack from above frequently. It is clear that the ultimate benefit for a trainee in the Silat method is higher in this specific exercise, and why? This is a method that went through decades of wars and their main weapon was a knife and stick. When, from an application point of view, it takes many more study hours than an Israeli Krav-Maga method, the self-defense technique in this event is a banal braking and neutralization blow. The following is a theoretical example that describes two different learning curves for a homogeneous exercise in terms of its essence, let’s say self-defense against a knife.